Best Spots for Hot Dogs Near New York City

It’s easy to get a hot dog in New York — Manhattan is home to seemingly countless hot dog carts — but where can you find the best hot dogs in NYC? Let GAYOT guide you to New York’s finest frankfurters at famous hot dog stands, classic diners and gourmet butchers, presented in alphabetical order.

1

Brooklyn Diner

Nostalgic for the good old days when the Dodgers still played in Brooklyn and you could get a real egg cream without worrying about cholesterol? This shiny metal-trimmed restaurant looks like a Brooklyn snack shop right out of the `50s, complete with a soda fountain and Brooklyn Dodgers memorabilia. You can get a malt, an authentic 15-bite Brooklyn hot dog, and macaroni and cheese that’s pretty darn good. More information about Brooklyn Diner.

2

Crif Dogs

New Yorkers hardly need to search for a hot dog — they’re on every street corner — but they do need to search for a good one. You can get a regular tube steak with all the classic toppings, but why do that, when you could help yourself instead to a Chihuahua, a hot dog wrapped in bacon and covered with avocado and sour cream? The minds at Crif Dogs have no fear when it comes to tinkering with the frankfurter; they’ll even top it with chili and jalapeños (Spicy Red Neck). There are a variety of sides, including crisp tater tots, but night-owls flock here for the dogs, and they are rarely disappointed. Satisfy your sweet tooth with a vanilla, chocolate, strawberry or coffee milkshake. See the full review from Gayot.

3

Gray’s Papaya


This popular New York hot dog stand may lure you in for its cheap prices but the hot dogs are really quite good. There are no tables at this no-frills spot, only standing counters against the walls. The “Recession Special,” which includes two franks and a medium drink for $6, is the go-to order for many. Wash it all down with a tropical fruit drink (the banana daiquiri and piña colada are favorites). Be sure to bring cash, as credit cards are not accepted.

4

Katz’s Deli

Opened in 1888, this landmark of a Jewish deli in the historic immigrant neighborhood of the Lower East Side is a mammoth caféteria-style spot with the opportunity for great people-watching — the famous scene in “When Harry Met Sally” was filmed here. The grilled hot dogs and the hand-sliced corned beef that’s as lean — and as good — as it gets. Traditional desserts include black and white cookies, cakes and New York cheesecake. See the full review from Gayot.

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